Search found 3000 matches

by Dave Saxton
Fri Jan 18, 2019 4:28 pm
Forum: Bismarck General Discussion
Topic: Bismarck construction flaws
Replies: 390
Views: 120274

Re: Bismarck construction flaws

. But I think the designer might never reckon they will use turret armor to defeat a incoming BB shell completely. They just try to do as good as possible. Back to BS, It looks like the disigner just let go the idea of 14" armor defeating BB projectile from any range and take chance of glancing eff...
by Dave Saxton
Fri Jan 18, 2019 2:53 am
Forum: Bismarck General Discussion
Topic: Bismarck construction flaws
Replies: 390
Views: 120274

Re: Bismarck construction flaws

The slopes were angled-back 65 degrees. This presents a very acute striking angle for incoming shells at short and medium ranges. Even against large caliber shells it offers some protection at more likely battle ranges. It reduces the frontal area (14" face plate) that would be vulnerable to large c...
by Dave Saxton
Sat Jan 12, 2019 7:54 pm
Forum: Naval Weapons
Topic: fusing shells
Replies: 1
Views: 240

Re: fusing shells

Tommy303 can give you much more detailed information. Armor piercing units are screwed into the base of the main body like a bolt is screwed into something by wrench. They work by inertia, so when the shell encounters sufficient deceleration it goes off. The deceleration causes a firing pin to strik...
by Dave Saxton
Thu Dec 27, 2018 4:44 pm
Forum: Hypothetical Naval Scenarios
Topic: Scharnhorst w/ 38cm's and other improvements
Replies: 19
Views: 2724

Re: Scharnhorst w/ 38cm's and other improvements

During Scharnhorst's last mission, the battle of North Cape, she hit the Norfolk twice, but failed to hit the Duke of York even once. 38 cm guns would have decreased her chances of hitting the Duke of York. Not getting hits with bigger guns doesn't help. Better radar and radar use was needed instea...
by Dave Saxton
Fri Dec 21, 2018 8:25 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: Pacific war: decisive battle doctrines
Replies: 6
Views: 396

Re: Pacific war: decisive battle doctrines

WPL-46 is Rainbow 5
by Dave Saxton
Fri Dec 21, 2018 3:15 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: Pacific war: decisive battle doctrines
Replies: 6
Views: 396

Re: Pacific war: decisive battle doctrines

IJN decisive battle plans The Japanese also were imbued with the doctrines of Mahan. Additionally, their own naval tradition included the Battle of Tsushima when a war was won by completely defeating the Russian fleet in a single decisive battle as recently as 1905. The Japanese decisive battle doc...
by Dave Saxton
Fri Dec 21, 2018 3:01 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: Pacific war: decisive battle doctrines
Replies: 6
Views: 396

Re: Pacific war: decisive battle doctrines

Rainbow 5 Plan Orange was superseded, or a better term might be supplemented, by Rainbow 5. The Rainbow War Plans were drawn up to reflect the reality that no two nations were likely to fight wars exclusively between themselves. Rainbow 5 assumed war against Japan and Germany at the same time, and ...
by Dave Saxton
Fri Dec 21, 2018 2:54 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: Pacific war: decisive battle doctrines
Replies: 6
Views: 396

Re: Pacific war: decisive battle doctrines

The US Army saw things very differently. For Army planners the main problem was that the Philippines were indefensible to invasion without a large battle fleet already in correct position to repel a Japanese invasion fleet. The largest practical army garrison that could be deployed to the Philippine...
by Dave Saxton
Fri Dec 21, 2018 2:51 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: Pacific war: decisive battle doctrines
Replies: 6
Views: 396

Pacific war: decisive battle doctrines

Plan Orange: The Color Plans were broad strategic plans developed by the US Military during the early 20th Century in case of war with various possible opponents. Plan Red was in case of war with Great Britain. Plan Black was in case of war with Germany. Plan Green was in case of war with Mexico an...
by Dave Saxton
Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:37 pm
Forum: Off Topic
Topic: Treason May
Replies: 4
Views: 2155

Treason May

I see that Theresa May has recently been given the nickname Treason May.
by Dave Saxton
Wed Dec 12, 2018 3:18 pm
Forum: Naval Weapons
Topic: flashless cordite
Replies: 5
Views: 1776

Re: flashless cordite

I'm sure that I read somewhere that in the opening battle of North Cape Scharnhorst was surprised by HM ships Belfast,Sheffield and Norfolk who opened fire on her, but it was Norfolk who got hit by return fire because she was not using 'Flash-less Cordite' which enabled Sharnhorst's gunners to iden...
by Dave Saxton
Thu Nov 22, 2018 3:57 pm
Forum: Hypothetical Naval Scenarios
Topic: Richelieu and Jean Bart
Replies: 49
Views: 5738

Re: Richelieu and Jean Bart

Hi Dave, in terms of thickness, I agree the 9 ER mm would not add much to the 36 OD mm. I wonder whether they play a role in order to help de-capping the shell and/or enhancing the jawing movement before hitting the main armored deck, compensating (in some way) the presence of the 12 ER mm deck in ...
by Dave Saxton
Wed Nov 21, 2018 3:17 am
Forum: Hypothetical Naval Scenarios
Topic: Richelieu and Jean Bart
Replies: 49
Views: 5738

Re: Richelieu and Jean Bart

@ Dave Saxton, :ok: One question, in addition to the thicker deck in between the 2 armored ones, Littorio's did not use armor as a structural component of the ship, thus the weather deck was 36 armor grade steel + 9 ER construction steel. We know that 36 + 9 is NOT = 45 mm in terms of protection, e...
by Dave Saxton
Tue Nov 20, 2018 4:16 pm
Forum: Hypothetical Naval Scenarios
Topic: Richelieu and Jean Bart
Replies: 49
Views: 5738

Re: Richelieu and Jean Bart

true, but in case of Littorio's, the distance between the "de-capping" weather deck and the main armored deck is the same as in Bismarck's (2 decks). The only "problem" of the Littorio's is the thin (36 OD steel + 9 ER steel) de-capping weather deck, not really able to de-cap heavy shells at any bu...