Search found 334 matches

by neil hilton
Mon Jan 27, 2014 4:22 pm
Forum: Naval History in General
Topic: The most successful and most unsuccessful Warships
Replies: 150
Views: 87817

Re: The most successful and most unsuccessful Warships

I think 'successful' and unsuccessful' is a bit ambiguous and is open to a lot of personal interpretation, great for a lengthy thread. This is the way I would personally judge a warship as being successful. 1. The ship has to get its crew safely back to shore every time, therefore if its is sunk it ...
by neil hilton
Mon Jan 27, 2014 3:53 pm
Forum: Naval History in General
Topic: The most beautiful name for a warship?
Replies: 50
Views: 36307

Re: The most beautiful name for a warship?

Satsuma had been used before, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_battleship_Satsuma The other two names I can find no reference to. Japan has more provinces than it can hope to use as names for capital ships, so it uses only historically famous provinces. Satsuma was one of the starting regions f...
by neil hilton
Sat Jan 25, 2014 7:02 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: 1935 paper on British BC design, gun choice, attack range
Replies: 10
Views: 2006

Re: 1935 paper on British BC design, gun choice, attack rang

Probably the best post I've ever read. Brilliant. A lot of members could learn from this when they squirt out their stats and consider them gospel. An excellent first post and welcome to the club.
by neil hilton
Sat Jan 25, 2014 6:03 pm
Forum: Naval History in General
Topic: The most beautiful name for a warship?
Replies: 50
Views: 36307

Re: The most beautiful name for a warship?

As for my vote for best warship name...

.... A ship that shall fear only God, and dread nought....
by neil hilton
Sat Jan 25, 2014 4:49 pm
Forum: Naval History in General
Topic: The most beautiful name for a warship?
Replies: 50
Views: 36307

Re: Japanese warship names

Hi again, there is a fantastic website out there on the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN). You can find it at combinedfleet.com. As to your question, no, Japanese carriers were not normally named after provinces. The only exceptions were those ships originally laid down as battlecruiser, i.e., Akagi (he...
by neil hilton
Tue May 14, 2013 8:10 pm
Forum: Hypothetical Naval Scenarios
Topic: Royal Navy with Vastly Improved Air-Warfare Weapons in 1939
Replies: 7
Views: 3990

Re: Royal Navy with Vastly Improved Air-Warfare Weapons in 1

Could also go with the supermarine seafang, which was a contempory of the sea fury and bearcat and if anything slightly better, and would fit into ww2 rn carriers.
by neil hilton
Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:32 pm
Forum: Naval History in General
Topic: Greatest admiral of all time
Replies: 217
Views: 134435

Re: Greatest admiral of all time

Lol, Nelson... It comes down to what makes an Admiral "Great". Those who have a desk job can influence the development and success of a naval policy far more than those at sea, can set up the general strategies and logistics for the future and make a real long-term impact. But if it comes down to a...
by neil hilton
Sun Dec 09, 2012 3:50 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: 10 moments that changed the course of the war at sea
Replies: 117
Views: 21162

Re: 10 moments that changed the course of the war at sea

Seetakt FuMO27 (1940) Range to BB: 30km Range to DD 16-20km Range accuracy: 50meters Bearing accuracy w/ Max Signal: 1-2* Bearing accuracy w/ S-Rad: 0.10* Resolution for range 50 meters Resolution for bearing 6* These stats are similar to mid 1950s era radars. And the Germans had it in 1940, yeah p...
by neil hilton
Fri Dec 07, 2012 9:42 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: 10 moments that changed the course of the war at sea
Replies: 117
Views: 21162

Re: 10 moments that changed the course of the war at sea

From what info I can find Seetakt was actually a very mediocre radar. Seetakt: Range 8-25km. Range accuracy 70m ish. Bearing accuracy 3 deg. It also suffered from frequency drift but a good operator could minimize this problem. Type 271: Range 10-25nm. Range accuracy 150ft ish. Bearing accuracy 2 d...
by neil hilton
Fri Dec 07, 2012 3:32 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: 10 moments that changed the course of the war at sea
Replies: 117
Views: 21162

Re: 10 moments that changed the course of the war at sea

Another problem of the British naval radars operating at meters wave length was sea clutter. The British centimetric surface search sets, or even centimetric firecontrol sets, did not have superior performance than the German Seetakt radars. What it did was give the British a surface search set tha...
by neil hilton
Fri Dec 07, 2012 3:20 pm
Forum: Naval History in General
Topic: The Greatest Naval Battle in History
Replies: 248
Views: 180032

Re: The Greatest Naval Battle in History

But with a US invasion fleet coming over the horizon all those planes, even with the forces deficiencies, would have gone kamikaze on them by the hundreds. Not a pretty sight.
by neil hilton
Fri Dec 07, 2012 3:16 pm
Forum: World War II
Topic: Was US participation in WWII superfluous?
Replies: 146
Views: 48308

Re: Was US participation in WWII superfluous?

Also add to this the political and economic pressure put on Britain by the US to break up the empire.
by neil hilton
Thu Dec 06, 2012 8:32 pm
Forum: Naval History in General
Topic: The Greatest Naval Battle in History
Replies: 248
Views: 180032

Re: The Greatest Naval Battle in History

This would be very dangerous for the US fleet as the Japanese expected it and maintained a huge airforce on the home islands. This was why the US initially decided on high altitude bombing with B29s up in the jet stream so the Japanese aircraft couldn't get at them.
by neil hilton
Thu Dec 06, 2012 8:27 pm
Forum: World War II
Topic: Was US participation in WWII superfluous?
Replies: 146
Views: 48308

Re: Was US participation in WWII superfluous?

My mistake spelling Gandhi oops. The rest of my statement was correct.
by neil hilton
Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:05 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: 10 moments that changed the course of the war at sea
Replies: 117
Views: 21162

Re: 10 moments that changed the course of the war at sea

The author of a German report on the equipment, Otto Hachenberg, subsequently became a colleague of the present author in radio astronomy. He died in 2001 and his report of May 1943 was discovered among his papers. It reveals that the principle of the cavity magnetron was already well known in Germ...