Search found 28 matches

by Ken Thompson
Fri Dec 30, 2011 3:21 am
Forum: World War II
Topic: Sea Lion 1941
Replies: 73
Views: 11766

Re: Sea Lion 1941

No they didn't have the sea lift capability and if they did the British would have bombed it before they could assemble it.
by Ken Thompson
Wed Dec 28, 2011 4:59 pm
Forum: Hypothetical Naval Scenarios
Topic: Would Yamato with advanced AA gunnery survive air attack ?
Replies: 78
Views: 12429

Re: Would Yamato with advanced AA gunnery survive air attack

What they needed is CAP or combat air patrol to intercept and breakup the incoming attack just like the POW and Repulse needed. Late in the war the American tactic was for fighter planes with machine guns and rockets to take out the AA first. AA is most effective in point defense as in the Okinawa r...
by Ken Thompson
Thu Dec 22, 2011 1:21 am
Forum: Warship Photos
Topic: USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park
Replies: 23
Views: 16339

Re: USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park

Actually it looks better than it did when I visited it in 1977 and more displays. You have to remember that this are took the brunt of hurricane Katrina not so long ago. The ship also has no fuel and ammunition load so its floating much higher and they painted the water line down so it makes the shi...
by Ken Thompson
Tue Dec 13, 2011 7:57 pm
Forum: Naval Propulsion
Topic: Graf Spee Diesel Engines
Replies: 28
Views: 40510

Re: Graf Spee Diesel Engines

Fottinger transformer; Looks like a torque converter as in Buick Dynaflow. I don't think it would get anywhere near 95% efficiency and the Dynaflow got an early version of a lock up system to improve the overall propulsion efficiency but the engine to wheel reduction was all in the rear axle ratio. ...
by Ken Thompson
Tue Nov 15, 2011 8:35 pm
Forum: Naval Propulsion
Topic: Graf Spee Diesel Engines
Replies: 28
Views: 40510

Re: Graf Spee Diesel Engines

..... A hydraulic coupling system (named after its designer IIRC) was used in certain German destroyers and torpedo boats in WW1. Review of the time were largely favorable. B Isn't this where Chrysler got the idea for "fluid Drive". From my own experience if fluid leaks out - no drive. In the case ...
by Ken Thompson
Tue Nov 15, 2011 4:51 pm
Forum: Naval History (1922-1945)
Topic: Best cruisers of WWII and the best use of cruisers
Replies: 171
Views: 72745

Re: Best cruisers of WWII and the best use of cruisers

I thought that the Alaska class were built to counter similar "large" cruisers the Japanese were planning. The Alaska's should have been cancelled along with the Montana class battleships. President Roosevelt was behind this as well as the escort carrier program and the conversion of 9 light cruiser...
by Ken Thompson
Fri Nov 11, 2011 12:35 am
Forum: Naval Propulsion
Topic: Variable pitch propellers
Replies: 10
Views: 10157

Re: Variable pitch propellers

I would think that adjustable pitch propellers would be considered subseptable to shock damage so it would have taken a lot of development. The vertical Voith Schneider propellers if you consider that variable pitch were used in WW 2 on German minesweepers.
by Ken Thompson
Wed Nov 09, 2011 2:11 am
Forum: Bismarck General Discussion
Topic: Portholes in the hull
Replies: 6
Views: 3154

Re: Portholes in the hull

Every port hole I've seen on commercial vessels has a inside cover that will seal off the opening in rough weather.
by Ken Thompson
Thu Nov 03, 2011 8:59 pm
Forum: Naval Propulsion
Topic: Graf Spee Diesel Engines
Replies: 28
Views: 40510

Re: Graf Spee Diesel Engines

The MAN double acting 2 stroke engine seems to be a developmental dead end. Unfortunately the American company, H.O.R built some smaller versions under license for use in submarines with disastrous results. The large 2 stroke engines now used in container ships are of the single acting uniflow type ...
by Ken Thompson
Thu Nov 03, 2011 4:40 pm
Forum: Naval History in General
Topic: Dreadnoughts sunk by gunfire alone?
Replies: 8
Views: 10525

Re: Dreadnoughts sunk by gunfire alone?

Its not obvious as it was an internal explosion that destroyed it. There were a lot of those such as the HMS Vanguard and HMS Bulwark in WW 1, both sunk by internal explosions while at anchor. Maybe we should qualify it as sinking by solely punching holes it it.
by Ken Thompson
Sun Oct 30, 2011 1:12 am
Forum: The Ironclad & Pre-dreadnought Era (1860-1905)
Topic: Spanish American War naval combats
Replies: 17
Views: 15079

Re: Spanish American War naval combats

The success of the 8 inch gun in the Philippines encouraged the US Navy to load up the subsequent battleships with the 8 inch guns as the intermediate battery. Going to the extreme with a 2 story main turret. The Vesuvius reminds me of the LSM(R)'s of WW 2. Armed with rocket launchers to lay down a ...
by Ken Thompson
Mon Oct 24, 2011 9:33 pm
Forum: The Dreadnought Era (1906-1921)
Topic: The African Queen?
Replies: 2
Views: 6288

Re: The African Queen?

"Concrete commitment" is an unfortunate term as probably most of the holes are plugged with. If they build a new one maybe they should use the old engine with new wood -ah biofueled boilers. The african engineers can handle that well enough. :lol:
by Ken Thompson
Sat Oct 22, 2011 2:54 am
Forum: Naval History Post-1945
Topic: NATO Battleships
Replies: 14
Views: 23015

Re: NATO Battleships

After 1946 the allies couldn't wait to get rid of their battleships fast enough. The US only kept the Iowa class in service on and off probably for prestige purposes. By 1960 all the battleships were gone except for the Iowa's which were saved primarily for nostalgia purposes. The same with the Fren...