British Fire-control and time of flight

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Thorsten Wahl
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Re: British Fire-control and time of flight

Post by Thorsten Wahl » Mon Nov 11, 2013 6:52 am

duncan it seems a typing error as it is only a 3m rangefinder
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A 6M RuM is a rangefinder with a 6 m. basis, correct?
yes
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comment on absolut and relativ
absolut means the sum deviation of all measurements from the sum of all true distances from a series (say if 40 m-
you have a target at exactly 10 km distance and if you accomplish 10 measurements you have to achieve 100,000 m-> measured total distance was 100,040 m

relative means average deviation of each individual measurement from true distance at the series regardless from the sign(+-)
Meine Herren, es kann ein siebenjähriger, es kann ein dreißigjähriger Krieg werden – und wehe dem, der zuerst die Lunte in das Pulverfaß schleudert!

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frontkampfer
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Re: British Fire-control and time of flight

Post by frontkampfer » Thu Mar 05, 2015 2:53 am

Gents,

A very fascinating discussion. I am very interested in German FC of both WWI & II. Are there any works in English on the subject as well as photos? Any info appreciated.

Thanks!
"I will not have my ship shot out from under my ass!"

Thorsten Wahl
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Re: British Fire-control and time of flight

Post by Thorsten Wahl » Thu Mar 05, 2015 12:46 pm

american translation of a russian document
russian information is mostly based on german ww2 technology

Title : NAVAL AIR DEFENSE OF SHIPS
Corporate Author : FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH
Personal Author(s) : Morosow, K. V.
Report Date : 20 OCT 1964
Pagination or Media Count : 108
Abstract : Contents: Deployment of air-combat facilities against naval targets; anti-aircraft artillery (anti-aircraft weapons, ammunitions, fire-control equipment, firing preparation); anti-aircraft rockets; combat experience in utilization of aerial combat facilities; organization of air defense aboard combat vessels under conditions of modern warfare.




http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD0607565
Meine Herren, es kann ein siebenjähriger, es kann ein dreißigjähriger Krieg werden – und wehe dem, der zuerst die Lunte in das Pulverfaß schleudert!

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frontkampfer
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Re: British Fire-control and time of flight

Post by frontkampfer » Thu Mar 05, 2015 6:36 pm

Thorsten,

Thanks very much! Any other info appreciated!
"I will not have my ship shot out from under my ass!"

AndyN
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Re: British Fire-control at Jutland

Post by AndyN » Fri Jun 08, 2018 11:28 am

Hello,

I am new here. Thank you for the opportunity to join. The discussion on fire control is very interesting. Three questions I am sure you can help with.

1. After the cruiser engagement, and when the main fleets met I believe Admiral Hipper wrote '‘the fall of shot was practically on one spot as regards both range and deflection. The shooting demonstrated how carefully the British had eliminated all the factors that increase the spread of guns … and how thoroughly their fire control installations are perfected. '

Does anyone know the source of that quotation?

2. How was it that this result was so different to the earlier cruiser engagement when the shooting of Beatty's cruisers seemed so patchy? Was the main battle fleet equipped with different fire control apparatus? Or was it perhaps a question of the courses the German ships were sailing at this point relative to the British?

3. A supplementary query. It is generally said that the guns on Beatty's cruisers outranged those of Hipper's ships and Beatty should never have allowed the range to close. However, in his autobiography, Admiral Sir Percy Scott writes that at Jutland 'I lost my elder son. A few weeks before he went into action he said ... if we have a scrap our gunnery lieutenant says we shall not fave a dog's chance as our extemporised director ... is not reliable and the Germans can out-tange our guns. We have only got 15 degrees of elevation; the Germans have got 30 degrees. They will be pumping shell into us and our guns won't be able to reach them by a couple of miles (p. 293).

Kind regards

Andrew

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