Can the German Navy Be Saved?

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José M. Rico
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Can the German Navy Be Saved?

Post by José M. Rico » Tue Feb 20, 2018 10:24 pm


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Dave Saxton
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Re: Can the German Navy Be Saved?

Post by Dave Saxton » Wed Feb 21, 2018 2:59 pm

Germany has flushed billions down the drain and hamstrung its own economy through its Energiewende policies. All this has proven futile and has always been unnecessary. It boils down to priorities.
Entering a night sea battle is an awesome business.The enveloping darkness, hiding the enemy's.. seems a living thing, malignant and oppressive.Swishing water at the bow and stern mark an inexorable advance toward an unknown destiny.

northcape
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Re: Can the German Navy Be Saved?

Post by northcape » Thu Feb 22, 2018 6:41 am

Dave Saxton wrote:Germany has flushed billions down the drain and hamstrung its own economy through its Energiewende policies. All this has proven futile and has always been unnecessary. It boils down to priorities.
Germans economy is hamstrung??? Just a 2-minute online research:

* The German economy grew 2.2 percent in 2017, enjoying its fastest rate of expansion since 2011, official data for Europe's top economy showed on Thursday.

* Growth was also almost one percentage point higher than the 1.3-percent average recorded over the past 10 years.

* And Germany notched up a record government budget surplus of 1.2 percent of GDP.

* “The German economy is heading into a boom phase with full steam,” said Christian Lips, an economist at NordLB in Hanover. “For 2018, we expect similarly strong economic momentum as in the past year -- the most important sentiment indicators are close to their historic highs.”

* In the 19-nation currency bloc, industrial output surged 1 percent in November from the previous month, better than forecast, according to a Eurostat report. Economic confidence is at the highest in 17 years.

* The German economy grew by 1.9 percent in 2016, the strongest rate in five years, propelled by private consumption and state spending as households and authorities are benefiting from record-high employment and ultra-low borrowing costs.

* Thanks to strict government budget policies, Germany has avoided the debt problems that plague some of its neighbors.

* The favorable conditions have combined to produce the strongest economic production per person in Europe


Sure, these are all signs of a hamstrung economy. But again, like with climate change, why care about facts when we can have ideology instead? Oh wait, I forgot these are al fake-news from the mainstream media, sorry.

And of course the Energiewende is the evil and costly thing, sure. Ever considered the costs still lingering from the unification with former Eastern Germany? Or billions resulting from the current refugee/migration crisis? Despite these and other obligations, Germany is still the largest and most healthy economy in Europe. On top of this, it can still afford a substantial health and social security system for almost everyone. Maybe they are doing something right, compared to other countries?

As for the Energiewende, they have also simply calculated the long-term costs of subsidising nuclear power and the associated costs for nuclear waste deposits, as well as a simple risk/cost-analysis of nuclear disasters. Subsidising nuclear power has changed to subsidizing renewals, for rational and not ideological reasons. As you say, its all priorities, and some developed countries still prioritize the long-term welfare of the society over the ideologies of a radical minority or simply the well-being of a few very rich people.

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Herr Nilsson
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Re: Can the German Navy Be Saved?

Post by Herr Nilsson » Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:11 am

The German Navy is paid by taxes, while the "Energiewende" is paid by consumers in the main. Energy-intensive industries are excepted from this surcharge by the way.
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Marc

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Dave Saxton
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Re: Can the German Navy Be Saved?

Post by Dave Saxton » Thu Feb 22, 2018 2:57 pm

Less money in the people's pockets by any means is the same effect. It always retards economic growth and innovation. Energy subsidies in this case are transfer of wealth from the poor to the rich. So unnecessary. Moreover, the needed funding to keep the Navy solvent is a fraction of what is being wasted by this.
* The German economy grew by 1.9 percent in 2016
That's pitiful. Nonetheless, they can't afford to keep six U-boats operational.........
Entering a night sea battle is an awesome business.The enveloping darkness, hiding the enemy's.. seems a living thing, malignant and oppressive.Swishing water at the bow and stern mark an inexorable advance toward an unknown destiny.

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