Death of W/Cdr J M (Max)Geudj DSO DFC 143 Sqdn CC

Non-naval discussions about the Second World War. Military leaders, campaigns, weapons, etc.
User avatar
aurora
Senior Member
Posts: 683
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 2:31 pm
Location: YORKSHIRE

Death of W/Cdr J M (Max)Geudj DSO DFC 143 Sqdn CC

Postby aurora » Tue Dec 02, 2014 1:47 pm

BANFF STRIKE WING RAF COASTAL COMMAND
January 15 1945.

A total of sixteen Mosquito aircraft from 143,235,248 and 333 squadrons attacked shipping in Lervik harbour, destroying two large merchant shins and sinking an armed trawler, the SEEHUND-Vp 5304 (Vornostenboot), they were usually ex-trawlers used for convoy escorts.

These converted-armed trawlers were usually between 150 and 750 tons (the Seehund was 320 tons), and carry 88mm guns, 2Omm guns and machine guns. These were what the R.A.F. referred to as flak shios. Along with intense flak the strike force had to fight its way home through a pack of nine FW 190s.The fighting was fierce a MK XVIII Tsetse Mosquito firing its Molins gun at the attackers managing to frighten them off, but not before the strike force suffered serious losses.

Six Mosquito’s were lost in the action, the heaviest losses sustained by the Banff wing in any one action. Amongst those killed was Wing Commander J.M. Guedj DSO, DFC, the popular Frenchman who had only been given Command of 143 squadron a few weeks previous and who had been a popular choice amongst the aircrews. His navigator Flight Lieutenant J.F. Langley was also killed in Mosquito "K" of 143 squadron. Other aircraft missing were Mosquito "D" of 143 squadron which crashed near Fjell, the pilot Flight Lieutenant G.A.M. Moncrieff missing, while navigator Flight Sergeant C. Cash’s body was recovered and buried in Mollendal Cemetery, Bergen. Mosquito "V" of 143 squadron was lost with pilot Lieutenant F.F. Alexander (USAF) and navigator J.A. Mcmullin. Mosquito "A" of 235 squadron shot down with pilot F. Chew who was buried in Mollendal Cemetery. While his navigator Flight Sergeant S.W. Couttie survived and was taken prisoner and Mosquito "R" of 333 squadron with pilot Q/M K. Sjolie and navigator C/M M.J.S. Gausland (Norwegians) also lost during the strike.
This attack also proved to be 248 squadrons MK XVIII Tsetse Mosquito’s last sorties from Banff before leaving the base to leave the squadron to operate MK VI Mosquito’s only at Banff.
Quo Fata Vocant-Whither the Fates call

Jim

User avatar
aurora
Senior Member
Posts: 683
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 2:31 pm
Location: YORKSHIRE

Re: Death of W/Cdr J M (Max)Geudj DSO DFC 143 Sqdn CC

Postby aurora » Tue Dec 02, 2014 5:53 pm

Now, it appears in the Royal Air Force records as "Commander Maurice" affectionately named "Morrie". He chose this pseudonym to preserve his family from reprisals. Oddly enough, the request at that time by the British authorities to the French General Staff in London for Max Guedj was promoted to lieutenant colonel in the air force has no effect. Now, the aviator deserves a thousand times this advancement: sincerely admired by the entire Mosquito wing of Banff, "Jean-Maurice" is involved in virtually all hazardous outputs that result its crews in the fjords of Norway.

They then face a huge air defence, the more terrible they must fly low to allow rockets to reach the targets in well-sheltered harbours. Wing Commander Maurice was killed January 15, 1945 in the company of Flight Lieutenant Langley, while leading the entire squadron to attack ships at anchor in the port of Leirvick, Norway. Three sections of three Fw 90 each arose and immediately engaged the two who did not expect it; they had never seen these German fighters in Norway before. In the confused melee that ensued, we saw Guedj's plane pursued by three assailants. Then that was it. That day five Mosquito did not return.

Commander of the Legion of Honour, Companion of the Liberation, decorated with the Croix de Guerre with seven palms, the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) and the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) with bar, this brilliant pilot had in 32 years- 1290 flight hours, including 630 in wartime. Not so well known as many heroes of the air in the Second World War, Max Guedj was not given special attention, but he was one of the best French aviators of that period, a gifted pilot and thoughtful, endearing man.

Translated from French
Quo Fata Vocant-Whither the Fates call

Jim


Return to “World War II”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 2 guests