British in Afghanistan, 1800s.

Armed conflicts in the history of humanity from the ancient times to the 20th Century.
OpanaPointer
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British in Afghanistan, 1800s.

Post by OpanaPointer »

I digitized some British documents covering their adventures in the 'Stan back in the 1800s. Fascinating reading for those interested in deep background. https://www.history.navy.mil/content/hi ... 78-80.html
paul.mercer
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Re: British in Afghanistan, 1800s.

Post by paul.mercer »

Thanks for that, not one of our more successful ventures, I think we lost about 16000 men in 1842.
Afghanistan seems to be one of those counties which is almost impossible for a foreign invasion to succeed, I believe we tried again in the 1880s when we were armed with the then modern breech loading Martini Henry and once more in 1919 with even more modern magazine rifles and machine guns.
The Russians didn't fare too well either!
The last 20 year escapade by NATO forces was, in my humble opinion, always ultimately doomed to an eventual failure, waging a war against people fighting guerrilla warfare on home ground was always going to be a no win situation in the end. There was a very good article in one of the mainstream papers on Sunday where the author stated that we cannot and should not, try and force our western values on another country by the barrel of a gun. How true.
OpanaPointer
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Re: British in Afghanistan, 1800s.

Post by OpanaPointer »

After digitizing those books it really bothered me that with such sterling examples we still sent our guys into that area.
Kev D
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Re: British in Afghanistan, 1800s.

Post by Kev D »

A book I can also highly reccomend about the 1839 British invasion of Afghanistan and subsequent disaster is ''Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan' by William Dalrymple.
We are off to look for trouble. I expect we shall find it.” Capt. Tennant. HMS Repulse. Dec. 8 1941
A review of the situation at about 1100 was not encouraging.” Capt. Gordon, HMS Exeter. 1 March 1942
Kev D
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Re: British in Afghanistan, 1800s.

Post by Kev D »

OpanaPointer wrote: Mon Aug 30, 2021 1:30 pm After digitizing those books it really bothered me that with such sterling examples we still sent our guys into that area.
Especially so with regards the Brits, in that 'they' sent them back in to the very area the Brits were most hated and had a history of defeat. What did 'they' think, that tne Pashtun tribesmen whose forebears not just fought but, and I mean no offense here, humiliated the Brits in the 1800's were going to welcome them back with open arms? Go figure. The words "military intelligence" has become more and more an oxymoron.
We are off to look for trouble. I expect we shall find it.” Capt. Tennant. HMS Repulse. Dec. 8 1941
A review of the situation at about 1100 was not encouraging.” Capt. Gordon, HMS Exeter. 1 March 1942
Steve Crandell
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Re: British in Afghanistan, 1800s.

Post by Steve Crandell »

We all seem doomed to repeat the mistakes of the past, time and time again.
Byron Angel
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Re: British in Afghanistan, 1800s.

Post by Byron Angel »

Look at the bright side, gentlemen. Over the twenty years in question, Afghan opium production grew by 2500 (yes - 2,500) percent. The only question remaining to be answered is who exactly benefited from the bonanza.

B
Kev D
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Re: British in Afghanistan, 1800s.

Post by Kev D »

Byron Angel wrote: Wed Sep 22, 2021 10:58 pm Look at the bright side, gentlemen. Over the twenty years in question, Afghan opium production grew by 2500 (yes - 2,500) percent. The only question remaining to be answered is who exactly benefited from the bonanza.
B
One thing is for sure, it certainly wasn't the farmer, nor the addict!

As for who did, well where to start.........corrept Afghan officials, the T'ban, international drug smuggling syndicates and corrupt 'officials' and local drug dealers in the countries it ended up in as herion.

Unfortunatley it was, earleir in the piece, a Catch 22 situation, erradicate the fields = push the grower into the T'ban fignting force (as many /most grew poppy simply as their only form of livelyhood, as oppsed to being T'ban sympathises); leave it in the field and put money into T'ban coffers to support their ensurgency. A loose loose situation all round for ISAF.

Still, what a fiasco that there is soooooooo much more poppy being grown now than 20 years ago. Go figure! :stubborn:
We are off to look for trouble. I expect we shall find it.” Capt. Tennant. HMS Repulse. Dec. 8 1941
A review of the situation at about 1100 was not encouraging.” Capt. Gordon, HMS Exeter. 1 March 1942
Kev D
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Re: British in Afghanistan, 1800s.

Post by Kev D »

Double post. Removed.
We are off to look for trouble. I expect we shall find it.” Capt. Tennant. HMS Repulse. Dec. 8 1941
A review of the situation at about 1100 was not encouraging.” Capt. Gordon, HMS Exeter. 1 March 1942
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