A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

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lwd
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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by lwd » Wed Apr 15, 2009 3:42 pm

There's always Canada. A lot of the good current generation of SF movies and shows is coming out of Vancouver.

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RF
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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by RF » Thu Apr 16, 2009 7:46 am

Bgile wrote:
No, but if it isn't made in the states you might not have the technology and skills necessary to make the battle scenes as realistic as they could be.
I think the British film industry - and film industries in other European countries - might have something to say about that.
''Give me a Ping and one Ping only'' - Sean Connery.

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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by Bgile » Thu Apr 16, 2009 7:54 am

RF wrote:
Bgile wrote:
No, but if it isn't made in the states you might not have the technology and skills necessary to make the battle scenes as realistic as they could be.
I think the British film industry - and film industries in other European countries - might have something to say about that.
You may think the British film industry is as advanced with respect to special effects as the US (and Canadian for sure) but I don't. Just my opinion of course, but one really only has to look at the Sci Fi results on Theater and TV to see examples. Admittedly there has been some very good work done overseas but it's not as common. I'm not suggesting that the scripts and acting are better.

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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by lwd » Thu Apr 16, 2009 11:15 am

Consider also that the special effects houses don't have much trouble operating from a distance. LOR was filmed in New Zeeland and its CGI effects were world class. CGI special effects can easily be done in locations other than where the film is made or the production based out of and if you want the people on site that's possible to a fair extent also without too much additional cost.

Another thought. It seams to me that British SF movies and shows have special effects in many cases that are laughable. I suspect this is intentional; it's a stylistic thing sort of like the spaghetti western conventions.

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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by Joe Hoffman » Wed May 13, 2009 1:37 pm

I am posting part of my screen play for a Bismarck movie. It starts with the battle at Mer el Kiber. If what I have seen on the internet is true,that spielberg and Collee working on a Bismarck movie. Then this is the only fun I will have with it. Please post comments and I will post more. J Hoffman

IN IRON AND BLOOD "Sink the Bismarck"

I. THE INTRODUCTION -1940------------------------------------
The opening scene shows a map of Europe being blanketed by the Nazi flag. The map and flag burst into flames. Film clips of Hitler’s tyrannical speeches and the goose-stepping German army are shown marching across the European landscapes.
FADE IN:
INT. CHURCHILL: THE BRITISH HOUSE OF COMMONS. JUNE 18, 1940
In this scene Winston Churchill stands before a packed House of Commons. Britain’s ally France has just surrendered to the Germans. Churchill is addressing parliament and the nation with his now famous speech.
CHURCHILL
The whole fury and might of the enemy must very soon be turned on us. Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this island or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the world may move forward into broad sunlit uplands, but if we fail, than the whole world including the United States , including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new dark age made more sinister and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace ourselves to duties and so bear ourselves that, If the British Empire and its commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will say: “this was their finest hour”.
With the end of the speech a roar of cheers and applause erupts from the crowd.
FADE OUT.
FADE IN:
THE HOOD: ON THE SHIP’S BRIDGE. JULY 3,1940
Mediterranean sea on a bright sunny day outside the French naval base of Mers-el Kebir. The Royal navy is undertaking operation CATAPULT. The British ships are sailing in formation back and forth out side the French harbor. The battle cruiser Hood leads the battleships Resolution, and Valiant, Aircraft carrier Ark Royal, light cruisers Arethusa and Enterprise and eleven destroyers. Zooming in on the bridge of the lead ship H.M.S. Hood. Admiral Somerville holds a pocket watch in his hand. He is looking down at the watch. Captain Glennie walks up to him.
ADMIRAL SOMERVILE
(very serious)
Captain Glennie; has their been a response from the French to Churchill’s ultimatum?
(He looks up at the signal Officer and sees the look of no on the his face, even before the captain response.)
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
No sir
(looking back from the signal officer after a long pause.)
CAPTAIN GLENNIE (CONT’D)
(looking soberly at Somerville)
This is a tragedy.
OFFICER
(an officer reports to Somerville holding a piece of paper)
Sir you have a message from London.
ADMIRAL SOMERVILE
Read it.
Both admirals stare at each other as they listen to the officer read out loud.
OFFICER
To Admiral Somerville: Do it now! P.M. Churchill
ADMIRAL SOMERVILE
Thank you. (The reporting officer hands Somerville the note)
The officer turns and leaves. The two are left alone.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
We could give them more time.
ADMIRAL SOMERVILE
The deadline has past. It is out of our hands. We have our orders.
ADMIRAL SOMERVILE (CONT’D)
(as he looks back down at his watch)
May God have mercy on us
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
(in agreement )
Yes sir.
ADMIRAL SOMERVILLE
(a pause of 3-4 seconds. He looks up and speaks to captain Glennie, loud enough for the officers on the bridge to hear.)
Captain, have your officers prepare your ship for action -- sound general quarters. Signal the rest of the fleet to be at action stations.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
(turning around and barking out the command again)
General quarters, Sound the alarm, Prepare battle stations, Send a message to the rest of the fleet to await our action.
ADMIRAL SOMERVILE
I will address the crew.
CUT TO:
The next couple of shots should show the ships prepare for battle. Alarms sounding, men running around, guns being loaded, Officer shouting out orders. The crew are in their action dress with helmets and flash gear. The lumbering main guns swing into action. The camera comes to focus on two naval gunnery officers on compass platform. The two officers are conversing as the ship prepares for battle. Commander Edward Gregson is readying for battle on the compass platform. Lieutenant commander Ryan is leaving the compass platform to go to his station at the fighting top.
RYAN
(Hanging his binoculars around his neck)
This is going to be like shooting fish in a barrel.
GREGSON
(As he glances back at Ryan from his station.)
I can’t believe we really are doing this. It’s not very sporting.
RYAN
(With one hand on the ladder)
We have to take the hard line. They‘ve bailed out on us. There is no room for chivalry.
GREGSON
I just think our French friends deserve better.
RYAN
(Ryan is already a few feet up the ladder and yelling down)
We should count our blessings. Their foolish lack of urgency in the situation has left them unaware of what is about to be unleashed on them.
GREGSON
(yelling up to Ryan as he turns his attention to his duties )
Point well then, but this is not how a typical “tar” would win.
Ryan begins the long climb up to the fighting top. When he reaches it he climbs inside and stations himself at one of the directors. Midshipman Jack is there waiting for him.
MIDSHIPMAN JACK
(the midshipman comes along side Ryan)
Those unfortunate souls
RYAN
(look down and at the midshipman)
You better mind your duties, Midshipman
(Pause)
What is our estimated range and bearing from target.
Ryan views out of the fighting top at the harbor in front of them. The wind is whipping through the open widows of the compartment.
MIDSHIPMAN JACK
Bearing is 045 degrees, range 17,000 meters. 0ur Speed is 17 knots on a south-eastern heading.

BACK TO:
Admiral Somerville walks across the bridge and picks up the phone to address the crew.
ADMIRAL SOMERVILE
Attention crew of the H.M.S Hood, this is Admiral Somerville.
Britain is fighting alone and difficult task as been entrusted to us. We regrettably have the burden of attacking an old ally. Not since the days of Napoleon at the battle of Trafalgar has the Royal navy engaged the French fleet. Our demand that their ships and crew either continue the war with us or demobilize in our harbors has not been answered. It is with a heavy heart that this ultimatum that the Prime Minster had offered the French was not accepted. Frances capitulation to the Germans has left the French fleet vulnerable to take over. We can not allow so powerful a fleet to fall into the hands of the Axis. This would jeopardize British command of the sea. Hitler could strike out at Britain. So, today we sortie in the name of all that we cherish, protecting those from the tyranny that has enslaved Europe. Today is a test of our resolve. Our actions will become providence’s beckoning to free man everywhere. That England will not accept the bale of despotism...
May the Lord bless us in our endeavor and God speed.

Somerville hangs up the phone and turns to Captain Glennie on the bridge and nods.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
Fire when ready. (Announces over the intercom).
A small bell rings “ting ting” then the guns fire. The thunder of the guns rattle the ship. Seconds later the ships down the line open up their guns on the French fleet.

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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by JtD » Wed May 13, 2009 5:06 pm

Well, reads like a Hollywood movie. Good drama, but too much black and white.

I'd rather have the Mers el Kebir scene seen with French eyes, to be honest, or the British be cold. I always hated the "I feel so bad doing this but I'll do it anyway" whiners. You do it, or you don't. Don't whine.

And the Germans were far more than goose stepping Nazis. There were Nazis, there were goose steppers, but a lot of them were neither nor and only a few were both. Obviously, they were in charge, though.

While France and the UK declared war on Britain, the Germans were trying to make the UK an ally. Of course this is something Churchill wouldn't say in a speech, but still. It's not black and white.

France did not surrender, it signed an armistice and the French colonies such as Algeria were not part of the contract signed with the Germans. The risk of the French fleet falling into Axis hands existed mostly in British heads. Even after a part of the fleet fled to Toulon the Axis did not seek to take it over. Of course this is something a Captain wouldn't say to his crew, no matter what a whiner he is.

Just my 2 cents, obviously I couldn't have done better. :)

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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by Joe Hoffman » Thu May 14, 2009 3:39 am

Thank you JtD
I loved your comments. The script is dumded down a bit to fit the need of Hollywood. I'll post more and hope that people like you give it a read. Those that use this forum are every informative and I respect their input.

JHoffman

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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by Joe Hoffman » Thu May 14, 2009 3:43 am

CUT TO:
The scene should show the splashes and misses in and around the French harbor. (Hitting the break water)
RYAN
(Shouting over the intercom) correction, 047 at 17500.
The information is heard by commander Gregson on the compass platform and those corrections are made.
GREGSON
(yell over the phone)
Prepare to fire.
(Pause )
Shoot!
The French ships and coastal guns return fire. The French near misses are a show of colorful splashes. (This was done to denote what shell came from what ship)
RYAN
(Witnessing the French shell landing not to far off. Ryan hears a small piece of shrapnel hit the funnel)
They’re returning fire.
(Ryan then glances back to the French ships watching their own shell hit the French ships)
The next couple of shots should be of the French fleet being battered by the guns of the British ships. Ryan reports what he sees.
RYAN (CONT'D)
(over the phone to Gregson)
Commander, we have the range.
Back on the Compass platform
GREGSON
We found the range, gentleman. I want full salvoes in rapid succession. (Pause) Shoot!
The French fleet’s destruction should be shown with the carnage in the harbour, fire and smoke, sinking ship,and of the French sailors dying at the British onslaught. Back to the Compass platform of the Hood. Gregson calls out for another salvo.
GREGSON (CONT’D)
Shoot!
The gunnery officers are determined to destroy the fleet. This in contrast to the faces of the sailors on the platforms who look uneasy about the business. Then a call comes from Captain Glennie on the bridge.
ADMIRAL SOMERVILE
(To Captain Glennie)
Cease fire. I want a report on the condition of the French Fleet and a damage report, Captain Glennie.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
(Captain Glennie turns and speaks into the intercom)
Cease fire.
From his position Gregson receives the order and passes it onto to his gun crews.
GREGSON
(Hearing the order repeats it to the crew from his position on the compass platform)
Cease fire. Keep at the ready.
The gun crews load their guns. Then stop and await orders.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
I want a report on the condition of the French Fleet.
Smoke from the guns is flowing past the bridge of the Hood.
Ryan is peering through his periscope watching the last shells land, with splashes and explosion in the harbor.

RYAN
(talking over the intercom to the bridge)
Hold on. The smoke is clearing
RYAN (CONT’D)
There’s heavy damage. Several ships are burning and one getting under way, it looks like a battlecuriser of the Strasbourg class.
Over the intercom, the captain addresses other officers on the ship. The captain’s voice is heard on the compass platform.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
(over the intercom)
Damage report.
(This is followed by a couple of officers reporting only minor damage and two slight casualties)

The captain’s voice becomes background noise. Gregson climbs up to the fighting top to witness the devastation. Gregson comes alongside Ryan who is standing at his station. Both of them view the destruction through their binoculars.
GREGSON
(Gregson to Ryan speaking over the report)
My God what have we done. The French will never forgive us.
RYAN
(talking over shoulder)
We have done what we had to do.
GREGSON
(as he pulls down his binoculars from his face)
This is no way to win a war.
It can’t get any worst then this. Today will go down as Britain’s darkest day.
RYAN
No!! No.. I think this is just the beginning, darker days lie ahead.
THE SCENE FINISHES WITH A VIEW OF SMOKE COMING FROM THE FRENCH BASE AND THE BRITISH SHIP SAILING AWAY.
FADE TO BLACK.

INT. VON MULLENHEIM-RECHBERG’S HOTEL ROOM JULY 4, 1940
THE SCENE OPENS WITH A FADE FROM BLACK TO THE GREY CEILING OF THE HOTEL ROOM AS SEEN THROUGH THE EYES OF AN AWAKENING, RECHBERG THE NEWLY ASSIGNED GUNNERY OFFICER FOR THE BATTLESHIP BISMARCK.
It is early morning Rechberg gets up, washes up, puts on his uniform, and leaves his room with a small leather travel case and a cap under his arm as he walks down the hall to the elevator. He enters the elevator rides down to the hotel lobby, and makes his way over to the front desk. The sound of a cleaning crew buffing the floors can he heard as well as the rather loud conversation of two men sitting on the hotel lobby sofas.
MANAGER
Good Morning, Herr Rechberg! Are you checking out?
RECHBERG
Yes.
MANAGER
Will you be needing transportation. I can Have the door man hail you a taxi
RECHBERG
Yes, thank you.
The Manager pulls a bell boy aside and speaks into his ear. The boy quickly runs to give the doorman the message. At the same time one of the excited men has come up behind Rechberg
EXCITED MAN
It seems that your duty is going to get easier.
The man shows him the front of the Hamburg newspaper, Volkischer Beobachter, with the headlines “British attack French Fleet.”
EXCITED MAN (CONT’D)
The British and French are fighting amongst themselves! The Führer has delivered us.
RECHBERG
So he has, has he? I think that this shows that the British still have a lot of fight left in them.
EXCITED MAN
(pointing to the paper)
Yes, but the French have surrendered. It is only a matter of time before the British come to their senses and kick out that war monger Churchill. The Führer has offered them peace. They must realize that they are beaten.
RECHBERG
I think that we all want peace
The man sees that Rechberg does not share his enthusiasm, so he turns away and walks back toward the sofa. He starts talking with the other gentleman he had been speaking with earlier. Rechberg turns back to the Manger.
RECHBERG (CONT’D)
Thank you (to the Manager after receiving his receipt)
MANAGER
The door man is holding a cab for you. (Pause)I hope that the war does end soon, I want to thank you for your service to our Fatherland.
RECHBERG
You run a first class hotel. If I ever find myself in Hamburg again and have the need of lodging, I will call on your establishment. Thank you again and good day.
Rechberg leaves the hotel lobby and goes out onto the street.
OUT SIDE ON THE HAMBURG STREET (ITS RAINING)
The doorman is holding the door of the cab open with one hand for Rechberg and has a umbrella in the other. The doorman shuts the door behind Rechberg and gives him a Nazi salute. Rechberg returns with a wave.
CAB DRIVER
Where to sir?
RECHBERG
To the Blohm & Voss yard
Rechberg looks out the cab window at the dark drab buildings which are contrasted by the long blood red Nazi flags that are draped from them.
THIS SHOT SHOULD BE AT LONG DISTANCE SO AS NOT TO HEAR THE DIALOG.
The cab arrives at the dockyard. Rechberg gets out and pays the driver. As the cab pulls away Rechberg walks up to the sentry. The sentry gives a Sieg Heil salute and Rechberg responds to the sentry with a traditional salute. Rechberg shows his papers to the sentry and asks for directions. The guard points the way.

INT. THE BISMARCK
Rechberg follows the directions and walks through the dockyard workshop. As he exits the doors of the workshop, the Bismarck suddenly comes into view. The ship is almost complete and there is great activity. Yard workers are busy working on the ship. Rechberg comes to the pier, walks up the gangplank and stops at the top. A sailor salutes him then checks his papers and points Rechberg in the direction of the captains cabin. We follow Rechberg down a hallway. Cables are running under his feet. Rechberg comes to the captain’s cabin and a sailor outside the cabin salutes Rechberg. The salute is returned. Rechberg knocks on the cabin door.
LINDEMANN
Come in.
Rechberg opens the door and enters. Lindemann is seated behind his desk. There is a cup of coffee and cigarettes in the ash tray on the desk. Rechberg walks over and comes to attention in front of Lindemann’s desk.
RECHBERG
Kapitainleutnant Von Mullenheim-Rechberg reporting aboard for duty, as ordered
LINDEMANN
(stands up and shakes Rechberg’s hand then sets back down )
I thank you for your report and bid you welcome aboard.
(Pause)
My objective is to make this beautiful, powerful ship ready for action as rapidly as possible and I expect your full cooperation. Because of your training in fire control of heavy guns your action station will be in the aft fire control station, since the ship is still incomplete you will not have enough work, so I’ve decided to make you my personal adjutant. This duty won’t occupy more than your mornings and in the afternoons you’ll be at the disposal of the first gunnery officer Schneider. He’ll tell you just what he wants you to do. This will be your schedule until the commissioning of this ship requires more training. Do you have any question at this time.
RECHBERG
No sir!
LINDEMANN
Good then. The seamen outside will take you to see Korvettenkapitan Schneider.
Lindmann stands and shakes Rechberg hand.
LINDEMANN (CONT’D)
I wish you well
RECHBERG
Thank you sir.
Rechberg salutes and Lindemann return the traditional navy salute. As Rechberg turn and makes his way for the door Lindemann sits down behind his desk
LINDEMANN
(loudly)
One more thing
Rechberg Pauses
(With a sly smile)
In the future , I would prefer to hear people on board use the masculine form when speaking of the Bismarck. So powerful a ship as this could only be a he, not a she. That is all.
Rechberg exist the captain’s cabin with a smile.
DISSOLVE TO:

Bgile
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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by Bgile » Thu May 14, 2009 2:17 pm

I like what you have shown us. I guess the question for you evolves down to the "common person" interest. You man need a love story or at least sailors saying goodbye when it comes to that.

Joe Hoffman
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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by Joe Hoffman » Fri May 15, 2009 3:31 am

THE BISMARCK: THE TOP OF THE TOWER MAST
A seamen leads Rechberg to the top of the tower mast where he finds Korvettenkapitan Schnieder and Kapitan Albrecht. The meeting is formal then becomes more relaxed
RECHBERG
(Introducing himself and saluting )
Gunnery officer Kapitainleutnant von Mullenheim-Rechberg reporting, sir!
SCHNEIDER
(returning salute)
Ha! Welcome aboard Rechberg we’ve been expecting you. (Shakes Rechberg hand) I’am Korvettenkapitan Schnieder, head gunnery officer.
RECHBERG
(shaking Schnieder hand)
sir!
SCHNEIDER
Let me introduce you to the second gunnery officer. This is Kapitan Albrecht.
RECHBERG
(shaking hands)
Pleased to meet you
ALBRECHT
The same Mullenheim.

RECHBERG
Thank you.
ALBRECHT
So what is your first impression of our Bismarck.
RECHBERG
From just what I’ve seen and been privilege to know, The Navy has built the greatest fighting vessel in the world. The Bismarck will strike fear in the hearts of our enemies..
SCHNEIDER
Yes, finally our navy has a first class battleship. We will defeat any adversary just as long as we don’t find ourselves out numbered.
RECHBERG
“He” is a magnificent ship. His speed alone should keep us out of that trouble.
The conversation becomes relaxed a bit.
ALBRECHT
Ha! I see you got the speech from the kaptain.
RECHBERG
Yes, Kaptain Lindemann made it clear to me his intentions for his ship.
SCHNEIDER
He’s made it clear to all of us!
ALBRECHT
So what is your impression of the “old man”
SCHNEIDER
(cutting in)
That’s what we affectionately call Kaptain Lindemann around here.
RECHBERG
He is a fair man. I believe from what I’ve heard of him, that the navy would have a hard time finding a better officer to command and ready Bismarck for war.
SCHNEIDER
Yes, the kaptain has his work cut out for him. This is a gigantic ship. And if you don’t know already. Its kind of an open secret.
Schnieder sees Commander Oels enter the platform.
SCHNEIDER (CONT’D)
(saluting)
Officers attention!
All the officers come to attention and the conversation becomes formal again.
OELS
(returning salute)
Good morning gentlemen. Who is our new officer?
RECHBERG
Kapitanleutnant von Mullenheim-Rechberg sir!
OELS
Well, Rechberg I am Commander Oels, the first officer of this ship.
Oels shakes Rechberg’s hand.
SCHNEIDER
The kapitainleutnant is to be our four gunnery officer, and I was just explaining to him Bismarck’s true size.
OELS
(leaning in a little)
Well let be the first to tell you Kapitainleutnant, Bismarck is not 35,000 tons as many believe, but a sea tank of 53,000 tons.
RECHBERG
(shocked)
That’s quite a difference.
SCHNEIDER
Yes, That makes him the largest ship afloat.
OELS
We’ve knock England’s old Hood off her throne.
ALBRECHT
When I first saw this ship I felt comforted with that thought that this would be my insurance policy for the war. A ship this big could stand up to anything. But with the French defeat it looks like I won’t need that insurance. This is going
to be a shorter war then the first.
OELS
Its only a matter of time until the British see that they’ve lost. The Führer has shown his willingness to come to terms with the English. If only they accept Germany’s rightful claim to Europe. He’s made it clear they can keep their colonial empire.
SCHNEIDER
I don’t share their view. I think the English are going to stick it out. How do you view the English, Rechberg?
RECHBERG
I believe a good soldier never gets involved in politics. But if you ask my opinion, I think English will hold out.
ALBRECHT
If that is true Bismarck could see some action.
SCHNEIDER
Well, What ever comes of our service to the Fatherland, we can be comforted that we have good kaptain and a great warship. (A long pause) Come Rechberg, we will give you a tour.
RECHBERG
I would love that.
OELS
You’ll get lost the first couple of days. But soon you’ll find your way around.
ALBRECHT
Yesterday I caught a seaman pissing over the side of the ship... He told me he got lost looking for the head. Well today he’s cleaning every head on the ship... He’ll know better next time.
ALL THE OFFICERS
Ha ha (all having a laugh)
PAN AWAY TO THE SKY AND FADE TO NEXT SCENE
THE HOOD: DOCKSIDE AT ROSYTH. AUGUST 16,1940
The Hood is entering the dockyard of Rosyth. A small crowd has gathered to greet the ship’s arrival.
The Hood has been docked along a pier. The crew that was granted leave make their way down the gangway. A paper boy is selling newspaper yelling out the head lines.
PAPER BOY
RAF battles Luftwaffe over the skies of England.
Lots of couples reuniting and celebrating(not too much talk that the war is going badly). A small group of sailors from the Hood are posing for a Photo with a young boy. His father takes the shot, with the Hood in the background. A young woman looking over the crowd anxiously scans the faces of the sailors coming down the gangway. Our character Ryan Anderson is making his way down the gangway. Almost at the bottom they spot each other and dash into each others arms. They embrace in a kiss
JOYCE
(pulls back)
You fancy that, do ya?
RYAN
Aye, my love.
The two kiss and embrace again for a moment longer.
JOYCE
I‘ve been so worried. I read in the paper you were in a battle with the French.
RYAN
Ya. Nothing to worry about. I wouldn’t call it much of a battle. The French didn’t give us much of a fight.
JOYCE
I was worried sick that something might happen to you.
RYAN
You don’t need to worry about me when I am on the Hood. I spent my time worried about you.
Its been far too long. It feels good to hold you again.
JOYCE
Oh, you sure know how make girl feel special. (Joking) Have you done this before?
RYAN
You know I have girls cued up in every port.
JOYCE
Now, stop (laughing) with all that rubbish Ryan. Your acting to much like Jack... I think he’s wearing off on you.
A group of officers including commander Gregson that are standing near by start to jeer the two.
OFFICER 1
(whistle )
Hey Anderson(Ryan’s last name) save a snog for me.
OFFICER 2
(laughter)
Lt. Commander, don’t think you’ll be getting any more after tomorrow!
JOYCE
(Joyce turns to them )
He’ll be getting all that he needs, you knaves. I suppose that the rest of you lads will be coming alone to the wedding? Couldn’t find dates?
There is a pause. The officers look down and around with embarrassment.
JOYCE (CONT’D)
That’s what I thought.
RYAN
Joyce go easy on them. My fate is in their hands tonight.
JOYCE
Ryan Anderson are you still going out with your mates tonight. I thought you decided to stay in.
GREGSON
You wouldn’t want him to break tradition.
JOYCE
Ryan? (Looking at him in the eyes)
RYAN
Well?
JOYCE
Oh! To hell with you all.
She steps toward them and points
JOYCE (CONT’D)
If he’s late, hung over, lost, or in any other condition that disrupts my wedding day. I’ll hunt you all down and you’ll wish that you were never born. (pause) You got that lads!
The men all respond with laughs, salutes and comment aimed at Joyce.
THE CROWD OF OFFICERS
Yes ma'am. (Laughing)
Ryan takes Joyce’s hand and pulls her away.
RYAN
Don’t worry, love (He turns to the men) I’ll see you blokes later. Were going to catch a flick at the cinema. (He shakes his head at them)
The couple walk off. The officers laugh among themselves. Just then Jack joins the group of officers.
JACK
You buggers ready to get pissed tonight. We’ll have to give Lt. Commander Ryan the proper send off.
The officers look at Jack in disbelief.
JACK (CONT’D)
(Looking bewildered)
What did I say?
FADE TO:
CINEMA
Walking toward the cinema. Joyce and Ryan stroll down the street in each others arms. Joyce is going on about her family. Ryan is listening. Joyce is talking fast and not giving Ryan a chance to respond.
JOYCE
Mother intends to plant a victory garden in the spring but,right now father started to dig up the back yard to make a bomb shelter. What do you think? (Without waiting for answer she continues on) Well father never finished, all that we have is a hole in the ground. He went off and joined the Home Guard. Can you imagine that, my father. The army must be desperate if Britain’s defence rests on old men like my dad. I’ve watched them at the train station in town. They don’t even have guns. All they use is brooms and pitchforks.
Joyce stops talking for a moment to catch her breath and Ryan interjects.
RYAN
The army is in desperate straights..... They had to evacuate France in a hurry and they left behind most of their rifles and equipment.
JOYCE
Well, whatever the reason father thinks that the Germans will try to invade England soon.
The couple arrives at the cinema and Ryan pays for the tickets as they enter into the theater. The theater is dimly lit and crowded; they strain their eyes to find two empty seats.
JOYCE (CONT’D)
The rationing, is not too bad. Mother scoffs at not having enough meat, but we make do. We all have to make our sacrifices.
RYAN
Tell your mother that the navy’s portions aren’t any better. And your father doesn’t have to worry about an invasion. As long as Britannia rules the seas, none of those European tyrants will set foot on English soil.
The projector starts. A news reel is shown before the movie.
NEWSMAN
(Need to find the news footage about the Battle of Britain. ?????? Then adding a part about the Bismarck.)
The new battleship Bismarck, the pride of the German navy and Hitler’s master piece of naval warship design was commissioned into Kriegsmarine. Her launched before the war was attended by Nazi officials including Hitler. Who is shown rejoicing in his new instrument for waging war?
JOYCE
(Whispering)
That ship looks massive. Is she bigger then your Hood?
RYAN
(Whispering)
She certain looks as big as the Hood. I doubt we will see her anytime soon. It takes time to train a crew for a ship like that. It will be sometime before the Bismarck is battle ready..
JOYCE
(Whispering)
I felt comforted when you were assigned to the “Mighty Hood”. Since it was the biggest and most powerful ship in the world. But, this new German ship frightens me.
RYAN
I wouldn’t worry, Bismarck is only one ship.
JOYCE
I just have a bad feeling about that “one” ship.
RYAN
Well there’s no safer place to be than on the Hood.
JOYCE
Then don’t ever leave Her. [Hood]
The main feature starts and Joyce rests her head on Ryan’s shoulder.
After the movie is overRyan walks Joyce back to her parent's house. After sharing a good night kiss, Ryan heads out to the local pub.

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RF
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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by RF » Fri May 15, 2009 7:45 am

There is a lot of dialogue here that does tend to ''muddy the waters'' and reduce it to a soap opera, the more important detail tends to be submerged within this and the script becomes harder to follow. I think you need to start this with a basic synopsis and then build upon it.

Two specific points. One, is Mers el Kebir really directly relevant? Secondly, too many Americanisms in a film that pertains to English, not American characters. For example the RN does not use the phrase ''General Quarters'' as in the US Navy, the terminology certainly used in WW2 if not today is ''Action Stations.''

The ''Sink the Bismarck'' film intro, with the launching of Bismarck got it right. Focus on that ship, don't go off at a tangent with peripherals.
''Give me a Ping and one Ping only'' - Sean Connery.

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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by Joe Hoffman » Fri May 15, 2009 1:25 pm

THE PUB
We see Ryan with his friend(Gregson) outside the pub. The government is enforcing “black out” and the streets look dark and deserted. One of the men opens the door to the pub. Light, laughter, and smoke all pour out as they enter. Ryan and his friend walk over to order a drink at the bar.
RYAN
I’ll have a pint(he lays out some money)
GREGSON
It looks like we have stumbled into something here.
Ryan turns around and finds himself surrounded by sailors. The sailors in the pub have gathered around facing Ryan. Jack pushes his way through with a cigarette hanging from his mouth.
JACK
(with a serious look)
No way, your money is no good here.
RYAN
(turning to Jack)
Is that so mate
JACK
Don’t think for a moment that your seniority is going to allow you to purchase a pint in this fine establishment.
MIDSHIPMAN
You tell him Jack.
JACK
I won’t allow it. For a man about to marry a woman, that I have a deep affection for, you got some nerve flashing your money in here. (Turning to the crowd that has gathered). I still say that she is too good for the likes of him.
Ryan steps up to Jack and looks at him face to face. Grabbing the cigarette from Jack’s mouth Ryan throws it down and grinds the butt into the bar room floor.
RYAN
That’s tough talk coming from a “snotty”. Look at you! You’re a mess, your uniform is a disgrace and you stink of cheap booze. You don’t have a speck of proper military decorum. Any good sense you may have had apparently has been dulled by the drink. (a smile creeps over his face)
JACK
Ha ! Well the drink hasn’t dulled my brain enough to actually believe that you are going to be a part of the family.
Jack and Ryan both smile and share a hearty handshake.
JACK (CONT’D)
Welcome to the family, brother
Ryan pulls Jack close and embraces him. The men around the bar roar with laughter.
RYAN
(whispering in Jack’s ear)
You cheeky bastard!
JACK
(pulling away)
Aye....(he turn and yells out) This man’s drinks are on me tonight so keep them coming. Tomorrow this old sea dog is marrying my sister. He may lose his heart to her, but he gains me as a brother.
Someone hands Ryan a pint.
RYAN
Cheers!

Everyone raises their glass to toast the bridegroom and celebrate the marriage of Ryan and Joyce.
JACK
Hold on.... Hold on....
(trying to quite everybody)
There are other reasons to raise our glasses tonight...how about a toast to those lads in the RAF for giving Hitler’s Luftwaffe a swift kick in the arse and making our job a little easier.
OFFICER
Hear, hear
GREGSON
And to Churchill who is seeing our nation through its darkest hour.
They each lift up their glasses.
RYAN
Hip Hip
CREW
Hurrah
RYAN
I propose another toast gentlemen, to Hood, the cock of the fleet.
Again they lift their glasses in a toast.
JACK
Hip hip
CREW
Hurrah
JACK
Hip hip
CREW
Hurrah
Ryan downs his beer with one long drink. Jack and the others pat him on the back and order him another beer.
GREGSON
This man needs another pint, he’s celebrating his last night of freedom.
OFFICER
If it was up to that lunatic Hitler we really would all be celebrating our last night of freedom.
FADE TO BLACK.
INT. COMMISSIONING DAY FOR THE BISMARCK: AUGUST 24, 1940
The weather is chilly, windy and over-cast. The crew of the Bismarck is ready for inspection by the Captain . Seamen are lined up in rows 3 to 4 deep on the perimeter of the upper deck. The crew is wearing their pea-coats and the officers are wearing their ceremonial uniforms. Some of the civilian shipbuilders from the yard are present and gathered on the aft deck.
OELS
Attention, face to starboard!

A white motor boat pulls up to the side of the Bismarck. Captain Lindemann exits the launch and makes his way up the gangway. The honor guard presents arms and the bosun pipes the captain aboard ship.
OELS (CONT’D)
(saluting the captain)
Crew formed for commissioning ceremony, sir!
Captain Lindemann returns the salute. The captain is escorted by officers Oels and Rechberg. They accompany him as he walks past the division of men assembled on the decks. The seamen’s eyes follow the captain until he passes them then they face straight forward. The captain salutes as he passes.
Lindemann makes his way toward the quarter deck. The ranks here are re-formed and are now standing in rows of 11 or 12 deep. The Captain takes his position behind a microphone and the podium located at the stern. Two signal petty officers are there holding the halyards taut ready to raise the battle ensign. (This signals that Bismarck is commissioned into the Kriegsmarine.
LINDEMANN
“Soldiers of the Bismarck” (pause)
“Commissioning day for our splendid ship has come as last”
The thousand years history of our German nation and Reich were written with Iron and Blood. Almost every generation had to reach for the sword to fight for the rights of survival of the Reich nation or to defend its existence and its freedom against hostile surroundings. For us the call has come again to join in the great struggle for freedom and the survival of our nation and the existence of the Greater German Reich that was created by Adolf Hitler. In the words of the ancient poets during the wars of liberation. “Only iron can save us. Only blood can set us free.” Today we are endowed and entrusted with a new and inspiring weapon made of steel and iron, our new ship. Today, it will be brought to life by our young crew which is empowered to blend iron and blood into a powerful symphony of iron-willed devotion to duty and conviction, and with red-blood vigor and fighting spirit the highest military goals shall be achieved.
The speech continues on. (There is much more to the speech, but even what is here may be too long as it is.)
LINDEMANN (CONT’D)
With pride and reverence we sense our duty as the crew of the newest and most powerful battleship in the world that carries the name of ”Bismarck”. And at the commissioning which I now transact, I cannot quote a better motto for the ship and crew than the words of Schiller which was the chancellor’s favorite verse: “If you don’t put your life on the line, Life will not be worth living.”
LINDEMANN (CONT’D)
Topsides, stand at attention!” “Hoist flag and ensign!”
The two petty officers raise the flag. The flag waves in the breeze and the Honor Guard presents arms again. The band plays the German national anthem.
LINDEMANN (CONT’D)
“Topside, at ease!”
DISSOLVE TO:
THE WEDDING DAY
As this scene opens we see Ryan and Joyce at the alter of a pretty,little country church. The small wooden pews are filled with officers of the Hood as well as friends and family. A Protestant minster conducts the ceremony. The scene contains little dialogue only Joyce and Ryan’s I do’s are heard. The camera should pan through the crowd - moving first to the faces of and Joyce’s parents and her brother Jack on the brides side of the church. Then the camera moves to Ryan’s side where we see only Gregson and some of the other officers of the Hood. The minster’s voice should be heard as the camera captures the faces in the crowd as it moves through the church and finally focuses on Ryan and Joyce.
MINSTER
Do you Ryan take Joyce in sickness and in health, for richer or for poorer, till death do you part?
RYAN
I do (smiling at Joyce)
MINSTER
Do you Joyce take Ryan in sickness and in health, for richer or for poorer, till death do you part?
JOYCE
I do (smiling at Ryan)
The next scene is of the newly married couple leaving the church as the crowd of well wishers applaud and throw rice at the bride and groom.
The following scene is that of Ryan carrying Joyce over the threshold at their hotel room.
JOYCE (CONT’D)
Oh Ryan, how I’ve waited for this day.
FADE TO BLACK:
RYAN AND JOYCE AUGUST 20,1940
The scene opens the day following the wedding ceremony. We see Ryan and Joyce in their room listening intently to Prime Minister Winston Churchill giving a speech on the radio. The scene then shifts to the House of Commons with Churchill speaking into the microphone.
CHURCHILL
The gratitude of every home in our Island, in our Empire, and indeed throughout the world, except in the abodes of the guilty, goes out to the British airmen who, undaunted by odds, unwearied in their constant challenge and mortal danger, are turning the tide of the world war by their prowess and by their devotion. Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.
The scene shifts away from the House of Commons and back to the newlyweds room. We hear the speech continue on the radio as we watch the expressions of Ryan and Joyce lying in bed listening to Churchill.
CHURCHILL (CONT’D)
All hearts go out to the fighter pilots, whose brilliant actions we see with our own eyes day after day; but we must never forget...
Joyce turns off the radio.
RYAN
What did you do that for?
JOYCE
I can’t bloody take it any more.
RYAN
Take what, love.
JOYCE
The War!!! I want it all to end. We are all living in this God awful nightmare! Hitler has cast an evil shadow over the world; and his armies are fighting to extinguish the very light that would awaken us from his nightmare. I am so scared of what might become of our world.
RYAN
(Holding and reassuring her)
It’s alright to be scared. I must confess that I am just as frightened as you.
JOYCE
I don’t believe you. You always seem so confident and unafraid in everything you do.
RYAN
Until now I would say you were right. But you have given me so much to care about and lose..
JOYCE
What do you mean?
RYAN
Until I met you I led a somewhat lonely and rather uncomplicated life... for what I thought were very good reasons. I was certain that the only thing I wanted in life was my naval career. I avoided making personal commitments.
Joyce, my father died serving with the Royal navy during the First World War. His ship was sunk by the Germans during the battle of Jutland. I watched my dad’s death destroy my mother. She died of a broken heart. I hated the Germans for what they had done... they became my heretical foe. Revenge gave my life meaning and direction. It helped me focus my energy. I was totally committed to my duties in the navy.
Then touching her face
RYAN (CONT’D)
And then I uh... met you. And I fell in love with you. And now I find myself in a strange place... bound to the fear and uncertainty that the future holds. The very emotions that I had never allowed myself to accept now have me agonizing over our fate.
JOYCE
I never realized... I didn’t mean to put you in such a position. We shouldn’t have rushed things.
RYAN
No.. No.. I most selfishly wanted to marry you now, but I pray you, if I were to perish at sea please don’t let my death it ruin your life as my father’s death did to my mother’s.
JOYCE
Stop it Ryan, your talking rubbish.
RYAN
No, You’ve giving me a greater reason for my very existence. The feelings I have for you are my salvation from an otherwise empty life.
Joyce turns and reflects for a moment. She tries to change the subject.
JOYCE
(In a more up beat voice)
Summer holiday will be over soon and I have decided that I will be going back to teaching.
(Jokingly)
It will be the only thing that keeps me from loosing my mind.
RYAN
I understand, we both have to live with the fact that this war is going to keep us apart for a while. I am so sorry, but I know our devoted bond will show its measure against the brooding discontent that separates us.
There is small pause.
JOYCE
The moment my brother introduced us I saw that look in your eye. No man has very looked at me that way. (Along pause)
You made me feel beautiful and special.
RYAN
You are beautiful. When I am at sea, I think of you and wonder what the future holds for us.
JOYCE
(reflecting a moment)
I know what the future holds for us.
RYAN
And what is that, love?
JOYCE
Hope.
She lays down on his chest as she falls asleep.
FADE TO BLACK.
FADE TO:
CHURCHILL
This scene opens early morning at the Prime Minster’s office. Churchill’s secretary enters as Sir Winston is sipping some tea.
COLVILLE
You rang for me Prime Minster?
CHURCHILL
Yes, I want you to contact the Admiralty and tell them that it has been brought to my attention that the German Battleship Bismarck has been commissioned into the German Navy and that it is being made ready for war. Now, I know it will be sometime before she could menace us, but I want a full report on her and I want to be kept up to date on her location.
THE DREAM SCENE
This scene begins on the open ocean: the camera dives below the surface. Ryan is in the water drowning... a bright light surrounds him and he is grasping for something. He wakes up in a sweat. He Looks over at Joyce soundly sleeping. The morning sun is already up. He wipes the sweat from his head and gets up leaving Joyce in bed.
FADE OUT.

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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by Joe Hoffman » Fri May 15, 2009 1:36 pm

I realize that the dialog is thick. I rather have to much then not enough. It is easier to cross out the lines that are not needed. I wanted to build up the Hood's story, without it the story of the Bismarck is less compelling. It's great that people are reading this. Sorry about the love story. The action stuff will pick up soon.
Joe

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Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by Joe Hoffman » Sun May 17, 2009 4:12 am

THE HOOD: DOCK SIDE AUGUST 21, 1940
The scene opens as the crew of the Hood is reporting to the ship. Ryan and Jack are being seen off by Joyce. We see Jack as he leaves the newlyweds and heads up the gangway leaving the two to say their good-byes.
JOYCE
Please be careful and do write.
RYAN
Every chance I get.
JOYCE
When do you think I’ll see you again?
RYAN
I don’t know. They’ll probably be keeping us on patrol in home waters to defend against invasion. I imagine it will be some time before they can spare us.
JOYCE
Oh! I think I may just lose my mind.
RYAN
Cheer up. Do you remember what I said to you, the first time we were separated.
JOYCE
I do. You quoted Byron’s Hour of Idleness
(holding back the tears)
RYAN
(his hand raises her chin up)
Abroad, or at home, your remembrance imparting new courage, he’ll think upon glory, and you. Though a tear dim his eye, at this sad separation, Tis nature, not fear, that excites regret. Far distant he goes with same emulation; That fame, and that memory, still will he cherish.
She embraces Ryan
JOYCE
(tears well up in her eyes)
Please don’t do any thing foolish... Come home safe.
RYAN
(He looks her in the eyes)
Be strong... for both of us. You’re a navy wife now, its your duty.
(whispering in her ear)
‘Post nubila Phoebus’ (after clouds,sunshine)
(Ryan gives her a kiss)
I love you with all my heart.
JOYCE
I love you too.
Ryan turns from her and makes his way up the gangway stopping as gets to the deck of the ship. He turns and waves farewell to Joyce and then disappears into the Hood.
FADE OUT.


THE BISMARCK NOVEMBER 20, 1940
The scene opens three months later as the Bismarck is conducting high speed trials of its propulsion system. We see Gunnery officers Rechberg and Albrecht outside on the open bridge of the ship.
ALBRECHT
This ship is one fast son of a bitch.
RECHBERG
30 knots or better.
ALBRECHT
I never thought I would see the day that Germany would again challenge the British reign of the seas.
RECHBERG
We have a great ship but I wasn’t impressed with the emergency handling of the rudders. The ship was almost uncontrollable.
ALBRECHT
Is that so?
RECHBERG
One needs to always account for one of those improbable hits.
ALBRECHT
You worry too much, Kapitainleutnant
He pats Rechberg on the shoulder and leaves him.
DISSOLVE TO: THE SKY
THE HOOD: THE NORTH SEA. DECEMBER 19,1940
The Hood is on patrol with the fleet. The seas are rough and the bow of the ship is covered with ice. The weather is frigid and nearly gale force winds are blowing. Ryan and Gregson are in the fighting top.
GREGSON
Lieutenant Commander Anderson come down, you’ve been on watch far too long. You must be freezing.
RYAN
Sir, The cold does have it’s bite tonight but, remember the famous quote “The love for my country keeps me warm”.
GREGSON
Who do you think you are? Admiral Nelson. You’ll be no good to me if you spend the rest of this war in the infirmary.
RYAN
Yes sir. I’m just afraid the Hun will be up to his usual mischief. Our diligence has to be up to scratch.
Ryan hands the binoculars to the officer on watch and starts to go down the ladder with Gergson in the lead. Jack and Signalman Briggs are checking readings from some of the instruments. Jack sees Ryan is leaving the fighting top.
JACK
Briggs hold this!
(He hands Briggs a clip board )
Jack steps toward Ryan and asks to talk to him.
JACK (CONT’D)
Sir, I need to speak with you for a moment.
RYAN
Commander Gregson, I’ll catch up with you in a minute.
Gregson heads down the ladder. Ryan turns to Jack.
RYAN (CONT’D)
What can I do for you Midshipman?
JACK
We’ve spent the better half of the fall penned up at Scapa Flow....
Ryan shifts his weight and exhales realizing where Jack is going to take the conversation.
JACK (CONT’D)
(clearing his throat and speaking only so that Ryan can hear.)
False alarms haven’t helped morale any. The men need a break. If we don’t get them some leave soon we are going to have a mutiny on our hands. We had trouble with the stokers before we left port.
RYAN
And what do you propose we do Midshipman?

JACK
You have the captain’s ear. It’s only a week until Christmas and if it’s at all possible it would go a long way if we could spend Christmas on leave.
RYAN
Jack! We are needed here! As long as Britain is under threat of attack we must stand at our posts. I wouldn’t bother the captain with such rubbish.!!!!
Ryan, thinking he has ended the conversation, takes two steps down the ladder. Jack puts his hand on Ryan cuff.
RYAN (CONT’D)
Remember your place Midshipman!
Jack removes his hand.
JACK
Don’t you miss Joyce?
RYAN
(Ryan looks up at Jack)
I do. More than you could know. But we are bound by our duty.
Ryan leave Jack and heads down the ladder. Jack looks down at the now distant Ryan.
JACK
(under his breath)
You’re impossible!
With that Jack turns and goes back to his duties.
FADE OUT.


THE BISMARCK DECEMBER 20,1940
The scene opens with the Bismarck still docked in Hamburg. A siren sounds for drill and we see the crew scramble to their stations.
RECHBERG
Action stations!!
Hatches are closed, covers are taken off equipment, guns are manned and shells are loaded. In the aft control station Rechberg holds a stop watch. As the men stand ready for orders officer Rechberg begins his walking inspection of their battle stations.
RECHBERG (CONT’D)
(speaking to a seaman as he inspects the station)
Seamen this will not do(as he points to his stopwatch). (Rechberg raises his voice for all to hear) We need to be faster; Do you think the British will give us time to prepare for battle... We must drill over and over again until we have the speed we need to engage and defeat the enemy. (As Rechberg leaves the battle station he barks out) Stand down and start over.
Albrecht enters the station.
ALBRECHT
Rechberg, drilling your crew again?
RECBERG
Yes..
ALBRECHT
You’re quite the taskmaster.
RECHBERG
These boys have a lot of room for improvement. We may yet see some action.
Albrecht pulls aside Rechberg, out of view of the seaman.
ALBRECHT
I came to ask you.
RECHBERG
Yes.. What is it that you want?
ALBRECHT
What are your plans for Christmas?
RECHBERG
I haven’t given it much thought.
ALBRECHT
I want to invite you to my wife’s parents house for Christmas.
RECHBERG
Well thank you for the invitation but I couldn’t impose.
ALBRECHT
Listen, I know you’ve been given holiday leave and I understand you have no plans for Christmas.... So please think about it.
Albrecht pats Rechberg on the back and searches his eyes for a response.
RECHBERG
OK, OK, I’ll think about it.
ALBRECHT
Thank you.
Albrecht turns and leaves Rechberg. Rechberg reflects on their conversation for a moment and then turns back to the task at hand. In a loud booming voice orders the crew.
RECHBERG
All right, Seamen we start over!
(Rechberg pulls on the alarm again and the crew starts the drill over again.)
FADE TO BLACK.

JOYCE AT SCHOOL
The camera moves up through a aisle of desks and comes to a stop at Joyce’s desk in the front of the classroom. The class is quite. Joyce is watching the children with something else on her mind. She breaks the quite by announcing that she will be collecting donated blankets at the end of the class day.
JOYCE
I hope that every one brought in some thing to donate to the hospital. Anything you donate will much appreciated by our servicemen.
The bell rings and the children jump out of their seats. Joyce stands by the door collecting and thanking them as they hand her the blankets as they leave. After the students leave she puts down the bedding on a table and sits down at her desk. A teacher friend pops in to congratulate her.
TEACHER
I just heard, Congratulations.
JOYCE
(blushing)
Thank you.
TEACHER
You and Ryan didn’t waste anytime.
JOYCE
Yes I know, I haven’t told Ryan yet. I’ve been saving it for his Christmas letter.
(pause, with a thought)
I hope my parents didn’t informed my brother, He'll spoil the surprise.

FADE OUT.
THE HOOD: AT SCAPA FLOW CHRISTMAS DAY
In this scene the Hood has pulled into the dock at the Scapa Flow for refueling and the restocking of supplies after their recent patrol in the North sea. The men are coming out of church service. Mail call is going on. Ryan sees Jack with his fellow midshipman; all the men are excited to receive their mail. He notices a very excited Jack holding a letter in his hand.
RYAN
What are you fools up too?
JACK
Congratulations sir.
The Seaman in charge of mail call hands Ryan a letter. He sees it’s from Joyce. Ryan opens it with one eye on the grinning Jack. He reads the letter and reads that Joyce is expecting
RYAN
(quietly)
Joyce is expecting....
(loudly)
I am going to be father!
Jack embraces Ryan who has been totally surprised.
JACK
Congratulations. Hey, this means I’m going to be an bloody uncle.
Jack runs off to tell the rest of his ship mates the good news. Ryan’s shipmates come over to him.

RYAN
I am going to be father!
GREGSON
(shaking Ryan’s hand)
Congratulations Ryan.
RYAN
Thanks. I can’t believe it ... me a daddy?
GREGSON
That’s quite a Christmas gift.
OFFICER 2
Do you know when she’s due.
RYAN
(looking down at the letter)
I’m not sure ... Oh, here it is.. She wrote that it will be some time in May.
Another officer comes up to Ryan and the group.
OFFICER
Lieutenant-Commander Anderson.
RYAN
Yes sir
OFFICER
The captain wants to see you in his quarters.
RYAN
Excuse me chaps, I’ve got to go up to see the Captain.
GREGSON
(joking)
I guess good news travels fast.
Ryan takes his leave and hurries toward the captain’s cabin. Ryan gets there and knocks on the door.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
Come in.
RYAN
You wanted to see me sir?
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
Yes. How are you?
RYAN
Good sir! I just learned that I am to be a father.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
Well congratulations.
RYAN
Thank you sir.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
The reason I summoned you.... I’ve received a request for your transfer to the cruiser Norfolk. They are in need of a Gunnery Commander.

RYAN
Sir?
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
Here are your orders.
RYAN
Yes sir.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
The Hood is to dock in Rosyth on the 3rd of January, for a three month refit. There will be a number of changes in the crew that will take place during those three months. Like you, I will also be reassigned. Captain Kerr will be taking my place. And as for you... Commander Ryan you are an excellent officer. Your gunnery corrections at Mers-el Kebir were splendid. The cruiser Norfolk needs a talented Gunnery Commander and you are the man for the job.
RYAN
Yes sir.
The captain hands Ryan his orders. Ryan looks down at the orders for a second and looks back up as the captain begins to speak.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
I know that you have a strong connection with this ship’s crew. You are popular with the men and they respect you. But, you are needed elsewhere. You’ll stay on board this ship until early March to help the new gunnery officer get familiar with the Hood.
The Captain looks down at the papers on his desk. The captain seems to be reflecting on his own departure from the Hood. The captain looks back up.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE (CONT’D)
All for King and country.
RYAN
Yes, I understand. It’s been a privilege to have served under your command on the Hood. I knew this day would come eventually.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE
Very good then.
They salute each other and Ryan begins to leave the cabin.
CAPTAIN GLENNIE (CONT’D)
Oh... and please do accept my congratulations to you and your wife.
Ryan looking back.
RYAN
Thank you, sir.
FADE TO BLACK.

Joe Hoffman
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Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 2:59 pm

Re: A new "Sink the Bismarck!" movie?

Post by Joe Hoffman » Mon May 18, 2009 1:24 pm

JOYCE AT THE HOSPITAL
Joyce is seen walking into a hospital with a large buddle of blankets and other bedding. The next couple of shots should be of her finding her way to the hospital’s office. When she enters the office she hands over the blankets to one of the staff.
JOYCE
I brought some blankets and bedding, donated by the school children
STAFF
Thank you so much. This will go a long way to cheer up the lads. The hospital’s bedding can be quite drab and this will give those recovering a little taste of home.
(Grabbing the last blanket)
Give our thanks to your children.
JOYCE
It makes them feel good to do their part in the war.
STAFF
God bless you.
Joyce leaves the office and walks down a corridor on her way out. She finds herself looking into a room were men are recovering from serious wounds (missing limbs, burns, etc). Joyce stops and stares. She is startled suddenly when someone from behind asks if she needs help. She turns around to find a man in a wheelchair. He is missing his legs and wearing a navy uniform.
NAVY VET
Can I help you miss?
JOYCE
No.. NO..I was just leaving
Joyce walks away and down the hall. She quickens her pace and exits out the entrance in haste. She is outside with tears running down her cheeks, she sobs as she leave the hospital’s grounds.

RECHBERG SPENDING CHRISTMAS ON BOARD THE BISMARCK.
The scene opens with a lonely Rechberg sitting by himself eating Christmas dinner. Most of the Bismarck’s crew are on leave but there are a few officers seated about in the officers mess hall eating their holiday dinner. In the middle of the room there is a small, decorated Christmas tree.
FADE OUT.
BERLIN: FEBRUARY 1941, HITLER’S OFFICE.
The scene opens with Hitler standing at the head of a large conference table and his senior officers seated on both sides of the table. Hitler is irate and will soon be screaming about the failure of the Luftwaffe to crush England under the weight of German bombs.
HITLER
(pounding his fist on the on his desk)
Reichsmarschall Goring you have failed me.
GORING
But my Führer....
HITLER
(cutting off Goring)
I gave you the simple task of smashing the English people and you have failed miserably. Instead of a weakened people, they have grown stronger.
HESS
Perhaps my Führer we can reason with them. Perhaps a peace can be found.
HITLER
No, No, No!!!! I have a better idea. (Calling on his Chief of the navy) Admiral Reader.
ADMIRAL READER
Yes my Führer.
HITLER
(Hitler is getting worked up)
I will crush their will to resist.
Admiral Reader, Increase our U-boat attacks against the British life line to the United States. Unleash our Warships to pray on their pitiful convoys. Sink the merchant ships that carry food and fuel to England. I want to starve that Island... I want them to pay for their insolence. Without those supplies, they will be unable to feed themselves let alone defend their island ... They will be begging for mercy when I am through with them. I tell you I will have them begging, begging, begging, begging... (Smashing his fist up and down on the desk)
Hitler wipes his hair back with his hand as he regains some of his composure and looks into the eyes of the officers seated around the room.
FADE OUT.
LONDON, ENGLAND: WAR ROOM MARCH 20, 1941
The scene opens as Winston Churchill is meeting with the war cabinet to discuss the strategy to engage the Nazi juggernaut. Churchill is standing at the head of a large conference table puffing on a cigar. Chief of Air Staff Sir Cyril Nevall, General Pownall, General Ismay and Admiral Pound are among those seated at the table with the other cabinet members.
CHURCHILL
Gentlemen, we have won the Battle of Britain. However, the war is still far from over; the outcome still hangs in the balance. Where Hitler intends to strike next is known only in his own mad mind.
GENERAL ISMAY
We are sending British Troops to support Greece in their stand against the Axis. Of course, this move is going to weaken the strength of our forces in Africa.
CHURCHILL
We are being stretched to the breaking point.
Churchill places his cigar in an ash tray
GENERAL POWNALL
Britain can’t continue to fight this war alone much longer.

Before the meeting Churchill had placed a balance scale at the head of the conference table. One side of the scale representing Britain the other side Germany. He picks up several of the small scale weights and begins to address the cabinet members while rolling the weights in his hand. As he speaks he will be placing a weight on the appropriate side of the scale to represent either a British or German defeat.
CHURCHILL
Gentlemen, every victory for Hitler tips the scales in Germany’s favor.
Churchill places one of the small weights on the british side of the scale and the German side rises...
CHURCHILL (CONT’D)
Poland -
(he places another weight on Britain)
Norway and Denmark -
(he places more weight on Britain)
The low countries -
(He adds even more weight)
France -
(The British side of the scale nearly hits bottom)

Churchill picks up the rest of the weights, looks at it in his hand and clenches it in his fist. He stops and stares into the eyes of the each of the men seated at the table. There is a pause as Churchill awaits comment from the committee. Sir Nevall clears his throat for a moment and then speaks to Churchill and the Cabinet members.
NEVALL
The Germans have kept up their night time bombing of our cities. Although recently I must say at a somewhat reduced rate.
ADMIRAL POUND
Prime Minster, our intelligence shows that Gerry’s navy is preparing to launch some sort of large offensive, very big, sometime during the spring.
CHURCHILL
‘I’m not afraid of the air. I’m not afraid of invasion, I’m less afraid of the Balkans - but- I’m anxious about the Atlantic.’

Churchill slowly circles the long, polished conference table as he speaks.
CHURCHILL (CONT’D)
Gentleman. Hitler wants to break this nation. He wants to starve us into submission. We are the thorn in his side. He knows our defiance will methodically bleed his Nazi juggernaut to its demise.
ADMIRAL POUND
We may have weathered the threat of invasion prime Minster. But Hitler is now turning his full attention to our convoys. He wants to deprive our nation of the food and supplies that they bring. U-boats on the seas and Focke-Wulf Condors in the air have been menacing our ships. His surface raiders are charging into the Atlantic to prey on our convoys as we speak.
CHURCHILL
Then this is where we must take our stand, however I must tell you that if we lose the Atlantic all is lost. For the sake of Great Britain we must prevail.
Churchill piles the remaining weights that have been in his hand on the German side of the scale and it bangs down on the table with a loud thud.

RYAN AND JOYCE MARCH 21, 1941
Ryan sees Joyce when he comes home for a visit before reporting to the Norfolk. Joyce has been staying at her parent’s house. Ryan knocks on the door. A very pregnant Joyce answers.
JOYCE
Ryan??? Oh my God!!!
She jumps into his arms kissing him.
RYAN
Surprise..
JOYCE
Oh. My lord. Mom and Dad, Ryan’s here.
Ryan looks down at her belly
RYAN
Wow. You really are big.
JOYCE
Thank you..
(with a bit of sarcasm)
RYAN
I can’t believe we’re going to have a baby.
(He holds her out to get a better look at her)
Look at you.. You look so good...
Oh I miss you so much, love
JOYCE
(Grabbing at her back and leaning back)
I missed you too.. I must say I don’t know how I am going to make it, my back has been bloody killing me.
Just then her parents come down the hallway.
MOTHER
So good to see you Ryan.
(Giving Ryan a kiss on the cheek)
FATHER
Good to see you home son.
(Shaking Ryan’s hand)
CUT TO:
The four of them enter the living room. Ryan opens up the conversation.
RYAN
I only have a two night stay. I am on my way to my next assignment. I have to report to the cruiser Norfolk.
Joyce just stares at him.
FATHER
You have a new duty?
RYAN
Yes.
JOYCE
In your letters you never mention you were leaving the Hood.
RYAN
(looking at joyce)
I am sorry, I didn’t want to worry you.
Joyce looks at Ryan with apprehension. Joyce’s father speaks up.
FATHER
How’s my Jack doing.
RYAN
Good.... he’s been staying out of mischief. The navy may still make a good officer out of him yet.
MOTHER
You’ll have to excuse me, Ryan. I have to start dinner. I am sure you and Joyce have a lot to talk about.
Joyce’s mother pulls father with her.
MOTHER (CONT’D)
Come father, leave these two alone. They have a lot of catching up to do.
When mother and father leave, Joyce takes Ryan’s hand and the two run up stairs. They enter her room and embrace in a kiss as Ryan reaches out and closes the door to her room. The next scene shows Ryan eating dinner with Joyce and her parents. The evening ends with Ryan and Joyce in bed. Ryan hashis hand on her belly as he’s lying next her.
JOYCE
I wish you hadn’t left Hood.
RYAN
I know, it wasn’t my choice.
There is a long pause. She realizes that it not something that Ryan had any control over.
JOYCE
The BBC has been reporting that German warships have been sinking our convoys.
RYAN
It’s true...It is getting pretty dicey.
Grabbing his hand she pulls it to the other side of the belly.
JOYCE
You feel that.
RYAN
Ya.
JOYCE
The baby’s kicking.
There is a moment of silence. Ryan realizes that he has even more to live for and understands that Joyce is really scared.
RYAN
(looking up at her face)
I promise to come home safe.
JOYCE
Please my love, Please do.
FADE TO BLACK:
THE BISMARCK. MARCH 22, 1941
The Bismarck is training in the Baltic Sea still practicing gunnery. The guns roar and the crew loads and sights the gun. The Hood is the adversary during these war games. The crew are at their posts. When the guns fall silent. Lindemann congratulates the crew.
LINDEMANN
(over the ships intercom)
Crewmen of the Bismarck. Our preparations are nearing an end. In today’s training you have bested the British and the terror of our war games the battle cruiser “Hood”. You should be proud of your accomplishment. Soon the Germany’s enemies will feel the sting of German steel.
The intercom is turned off. Gunnery Officer Rechberg address his crew.
RECHBERG
Gentlemen you’ve heard the Captain. You have performed well. We are finally ready to accept our mission and meet the enemy.
CLYDE ENGLAND. THE NORFOLK MARCH 23, 1941
We see Ryan boarding a small boat that takes him out the Cruiser Norfolk. The ship is anchored in the harbor. Crewmen are painting the ship and swabbing the decks. Ryan’s boat pulls along side. Ryan exists the boat and walks up the gangway to the ship’s deck. An ensign greets him with a salute. The ensign takes Gunnery Lieutenant-Commander Anderson to meet the ship’s captain. The captain is on deck a few steps away.
RYAN
(saluting)
Lt. Commander Anderson reporting for duty.
CAPTAIN PHILLIPS
(returning salute)
Welcome aboard Anderson. I have heard good thing about you.
RYAN
Thank you sir.
CAPTAIN PHILLIPS
The ensign will show you to your quarters.
LONDON, ENGLAND APRIL 20, 1941
Churchill is surveying the rubble of bombed out houses with his group of advisers standing by. Churchill is talking to a group of rescue workers.
RESCUE WORKER
Prime Minister, we’ve pulled out 3 today alive. We hope to find more this afternoon.
CHURCHILL
(Churchill gives the victory sign)
Good work. (Turning to the group)We can take it.
RESCUE WORKER
We’re behind you 100 percent sir.
Turning away and leaving the group Churchill is escorted by his sectary Colville.
CHURCHILL
(his eyes well up)
“poor people, poor people. They trust me, and I can give them nothing for quite a long time.
COLVILLE
Yes sir.
They both take few steps farther. Colville introduces Churchill to Roosevelt’s envoy. Churchill regain himself, he takes a deep breath and exhales.
COLVILLE (CONT’D)
Prime Minister, this is Mr. Harriman from the U.S.
CHURCHILL
Ah yes, Mr. Harriman, I believe If I am correct, your president sent you to see if England as any fight left in her.
HARRIMAN
Yes Prime Minister, the President wants to help, but there are many back in the states that feel it’s a losing cause.
CHURCHILL
You can tell your President Roosevelt that England will not fold.
(looking back at his staff)
I am sorry I don’t have the time right now but if you can keep up, you are more then welcome to follow along.
HARRIMAN
I understand Prime Minister, you are a busy man.
CHURCHILL
Too busy
The group finds themselves in a church court yard(or inside a large church). Churchill beacons his cabinet members to move closer. He’s looking to be brought up to date on the war situation.
CHURCHILL (CONT’D)
Give me the news, Gentlemen
GENERAL ISMAY
Our army has failed to check the German advance in Africa. Our Allies have also been over run in Yugoslavia and Greece in a matter of weeks. Once more the Germans are pushing us off continental Europe. We have retreated to the Greek Island of Crete.
CHURCHILL
Admiral Pound what support can the navy give to our troops that are on Crete?
ADMIRAL POUND
Well Prime minister, we will do what we can, but the navy is stretched thin as it is. We are faced with even more urgent issues in the Atlantic. As you know the German Battle cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau have ravaged our convoys in the North Atlantic. All of our efforts to chase them down have failed. The German ships were able to return safely to German occupied France. (Small pause) Our intelligence reports that what we all have feared most greatly has come to pass;, the Bismarck is now ready to join the hunt.
CHURCHILL
A nightmare that I have long dreaded...(Churchill clears his throat)
If Hitler’s engine of destruction, the Bismarck, were to break out into the Atlantic and cut Britain’s lifeline between the United States and our Commonwealth it would have calamitous effects. We must destroy Bismarck not only to protect our ships from material damage but to rid the seas of this evil and the negative morale created by her very existence.
ADMIRAL POUND
What would you have us do Prime Minster?
CHURCHILL
I want battleships stationed to intercept the Bismarck when she sorties. Preferably the Hood with another one of our newest battleships. That should give us the advantage. Have the cruisers patrol the approaches into the Atlantic. If they can intercept the Bismarck and hold fast to her, we could dog her to her doom.
ADMIRAL POUND
The Hood is just finishing up a refit and crew training. She should be ready in a day or two.
CHURCHILL
Good, then spare no time in having those ships in position.
DISSOLVE TO:

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