Scuttling a ship

From the Washington Naval Treaty to the end of the Second World War.
Fatboy Coxy
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Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2018 5:18 am

Scuttling a ship

Post by Fatboy Coxy » Tue Jul 31, 2018 9:06 pm

Hi all

Apologies if I'm in the wrong section, wasn't sure if it should be here or Naval Technology, but went with time frame

Question on the inbuilt capabilities for scuttling a ship over the period 1920’s through to the end of the second world war. The two ways I understand a ship may be scuttled is,
1. Opening of the sea cocks
2. Explosive charges against the hull

With regard to the sea cocks, what size pipe might they use on say a 10,000 ton tramp steamer, and where might these be located, ie engine room?
And secondly, probably build as a necessary requirement, what sea cock sizes and locations for warships

OpanaPointer
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Re: Scuttling a ship

Post by OpanaPointer » Tue Jul 31, 2018 9:33 pm

The last ship I was on, an LHA, had 42" cooling water intake lines to her main engine condensers. Blow those two lines and she goes down. (The main engine spaces were almost the width of the ship and over three stories from bilge to the top.)

Fatboy Coxy
Junior Member
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2018 5:18 am

Re: Scuttling a ship

Post by Fatboy Coxy » Mon Aug 06, 2018 8:39 pm

Thanks for your reply OpanaPointer

I'm not sure much thought would have gone into the need to scuttle a LHA of the USN of recent years, I'd struggle for find a scenario where they'd be wanting to scuttle to avoid capture.

But for navies around WW2, smaller ships could well be exposed to that threat, certainly submarines, destroyers etc.

The other need is a one of sinking the ship in shallow waters to put out a fire, something a merchant ship might be fitted sea cocks for.

I speak from complete ignorance of this subject, and welcome any comments that might educate me :D

OpanaPointer
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Posts: 136
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2011 1:00 pm

Re: Scuttling a ship

Post by OpanaPointer » Mon Aug 06, 2018 9:46 pm

The intake lines on the cruisers I served on weren't that much smaller, and the ships were considerably smaller, so the space would fill quickly. Filling the four largest compartments on the ship, below the waterline, would sink 'em, I think. We actually had on intake line spring a leak. We had to watch it very carefully for a few days until we made port at Yokosuka.

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